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Winter Minestrone 1024 683 gastronome

Winter Minestrone

This is my favourite soup, which if you knew me is a fairly large statement as I’m a soup fiend. I adapt Minestrone for all seasons, so it can be on a constant rotate. In spring and summer, I make it lighter with a choice of seasonal vegetables, I leave out the tomatoes and choose fresh fragrant pesto as the dominant flavour. In autumn when comfort and depth is needed, I favour robust kale, sometimes cavolo nero. And in winter sometimes I look for extra substance by adding a good mixture of beans, such as cannellini or flageolet, or if in a meaty mood a little good rustic Italian sausage.

As well as being beyond delicious, Minestrone is literally the soup that keeps giving. The pasta naturally thickens the soup overnight, and to remedy this, I add another tin of tomatoes and some more stock when rewarming. By doing this I’m rewarded by another fine batch, it’s regeneration properties always reminds of the magic porridge pot book from my childhood, which incidentally I was equally enthralled and terrified by.

I recommend you freeze a couple of portions, for enjoying on cold lazy days when cooking is simply beyond you.

Winter Minestrone

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Medium
Servings

6

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

35

minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp of olive oil

  • 25g butter

  • 2 cloves garlic minced

  • 2 tsp of sugar

  • 1 large onion, finely diced

  • 3-4 carrots, finely diced

  • 4 sticks of celery, finely diced

  • 1 courgette, finely diced

  • 2 tbsp tomato puree

  • 1 bay leaf

  • 1 glass of red wine

  • 3 tins of chopped tomatoes

  • 1 tin of flageolet beans, drained

  • 1.5 – 2 litres of vegetable stock, as instructed on tin.

  • 125g spaghetti

  • 2 handfuls of roughly chopped savoy cabbage

  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Grated Parmigiano Reggiano to serve, or Pecorino if vegetarian.

Directions

  • Melt the butter and oil in a large saucepan, then add the minced garlic.
  • Add all the diced vegetables and sweat down until they soften.
  • Add the tomato puree and give a good stir, then add the wine, sugar and bay leaf
  • Cook until the mixture is beginning to get ‘jammy’ and needs liquid, approximately 10 minutes.
  • Add the chopped tomatoes, beans, made up stock and season, cook for a further 12 minutes, then add the spaghetti, cook for a further 6 minutes.
  • Add the cabbage, check seasoning again and cook for a further 15 mins
  • Serve with grated parmesan if desired

Notes

  • Grated Parmigiano Reggiano to serve, or Pecorino if vegetarian.
Roasted Red Onion Soup with Welsh Rarebit Toasts 1024 792 gastronome

Roasted Red Onion Soup with Welsh Rarebit Toasts

Being a child of the seventies and eighties, I’m a natural sucker for a French onion soup. The thrill of seeing molten cheese on a floating toast was (and still is) my idea of heaven, married with the umami rich depth of the ‘oniony’ broth it was unlike anything I had ever tasted before – it was Wales in the seventies after all! French Onion Soup was one of the first things my husband and I attempted for our first dinner party when we were young out of work actors living in a tiny flat in South London, oh the sophistication.

It was with memories of this that I thought I decided to try a riff on the classic. I wanted to try roasting red onions and to update the usual melting gruyere with another part of my history – Welsh rarebit. Rarebit is really just an elaborate cheese on toast with many recipe variations if you care to search the internet, but this is one that I grew up with in Cardiff and the one that we still serve at our restaurant Gastrono-me in Suffolk today.

By using red onions and red wine the soup becomes more intense in flavour and colour, and I think embodies autumn’s rich hues perfectly.

Roasted Red Onion Soup with Welsh Rarebit Toasts

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Medium
Servings

6

servings
Prep time

20

minutes
Cooking time

35

minutes

Ingredients

  • 750g red onions sliced

  • 4 tbsp of olive oil

  • 30g butter

  • 1 large glass of red wine

  • 1 tsp of dark soy sauce

  • 1tbsp of balsamic vinegar

  • 2 tsp of sugar

  • 2 sprigs of thyme

  • 1 bay leaf

  • 1-2 cloves of garlic minced

  • 1 litre of vegetable stock

  • Salt and ground black pepper

  • ½ French stick for rarebit toasts

  • Welsh Rarebit Mix
  • 200g of extra mature Cheddar cheese, grated

  • 3 tbsp of milk

  • 1 tsp of English mustard

  • 1/2tsp of white pepper

  • Salt to taste

  • 2 egg yolks

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 230C/450F/gas mark 8
  • Put the onions in a large ovenproof crockpot, pour over the olive oil and roast for 25mins or until the onions have softened and begun to char at the ends slightly
  • Remove from the oven, and transfer to a medium heat on the hob.
  • Add the butter, red wine, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, sugar, thyme and bay leaf and minced garlic
  • Stir constantly until jammy and caramelised
  • Pour in the vegetable stock, and season to taste, cook for a further 15 mins
  • Meanwhile make the rarebit mix. Add the cheddar, mustard, salt and pepper to a bowl and beat well. Add the egg yolks one at a time, with a little of the milk and beat well after each addition. Continue until you have a golden well incorporated mix.
  • When ready to serve, cut the bread into 6 rounds and toast lightly under a hot grill
  • Dollop on the rarebit mix and grill until the toasts are puffy and bubbling hot
  • Pour the warmed soup into bowls, and top with the melting cheesy rarebit toast
Beer Battered Avocado Tacos 819 1024 gastronome

Beer Battered Avocado Tacos

This recipe is a great and most delicious way to use up slightly unripe avocados. This recipe won’t work with ‘bullet hard’ avocados though, those avos will have to cuddle up with some bananas for a little while to speed up the process!

Simply by deep frying avocados in a lightly seasoned beer batter, you will create the tastiest dish ever. These mouth-watering tacos are light and crispy on the outside, yet flavourful and buttery on the inside. Serve them in soft flour tortillas filled with fresh corn and black bean salsa, crispy cos lettuce, pink pickled onions, and an addictive smoky chipotle crema.

When making this recipe you will have way more salsa and crema than you need, but this is a GOOD thing! Use both the crema and salsa in a breakfast burrito (recipe to follow soon…) or simply add them to any favourite salad or prepared rice to really zing them up.

These tacos have become a best-seller at Gastrono-me, too often the vegan option in restaurants are a bit holier than thou! Vegans want to kickback too and enjoy something ‘junky’ and this recipe is a good choice for that – spicy, deep-fried and ‘creamy’ thanks to the immense chipotle crema.

Hope you make these; they are utterly addictive…you have been warned!

Beer Battered Avocado Tacos

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Medium
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

20

minutes
Cooking time

10

minutes

Ingredients

  • For the Chipotle Crema
  • 250g vegan plain yoghurt

  • ½ tsp of chipotle paste

  • 4 pieces of roasted red pepper preserved in oil

  • 3 shakes of Tabasco smoky chipotle pepper sauce

  • ½ tsp of smoked paprika

  • ½ tsp of minced garlic

  • ½ tsp of salt

  • A pinch of chilli flakes

  • For the Corn and Black Bean Salsa
  • 6 tomatoes, deseeded and the flesh diced

  • 2 small red onions diced

  • 1 lime squeezed

  • 198g tin of sweetcorn

  • 400g black beans

  • 1 tbsp of olive oil

  • ½ tsp of minced garlic

  • Handful of chopped coriander

  • A sprinkle of chilli flakes

  • Salt to taste

  • For the avocado tacos
  • 2 avocados, sliced into chunks

  • 125g plain flour

  • 1 ½ tsp of baking powder

  • ½ tsp of salt

  • ½ tsp of smoked paprika

  • 165ml of lager

  • 1 tbsp of sriracha sauce

  • For serving
  • 8 mini flour tortillas

  • Pink pickled onions (Waitrose sell these)

  • Cos or any crispy lettuce sliced

  • Sriracha Sauce or hot sauce of your choice

  • Spring onions & chopped chives to finish

Directions

  • To make the Chipotle Crema, put all of the ingredients into a small food processor or blender, blitz until smooth, then pour into a jug and chill until needed.
  • For the salsa, combine all the ingredients and season to taste.
  • For the beer batter, measure the flour, baking powder, salt, smoked paprika into a bowl and whisk just to ensure they are combined. With the whisk incorporate the beer gradually, until you have a smooth batter.
  • Prepare the tortillas by warming in a dry frying pan or wrap in foil and warm together at 175c/ 350f for 10mins. When warmed, fill with lettuce, a spoonful of chipotle crema, and top with a large spoonful of corn and bean salsa.
  • Dip the avocado chunks in the prepared batter, and carefully lower into the hot oil. Move them around after 30 seconds to ensure they are cooking evenly and not sticking together. I tend to fry this amount in two batches as to not lower the temperature of the oil and to ensure supreme crispness. Fry for a further minute.
  • Arrange the battered avocado pieces in each tortilla, then top with pink pickled onions, drizzle with sriracha and sprinkle over spring onions and chives to finish.

Notes

  • You will need a deep fat fryer preheated to 175c/350f
Carbonara 789 1024 gastronome

Carbonara

Once said by the iconic actress Sophia Loren: “Everything you see I owe to spaghetti”. If only that were true for me! I don’t think there is ever a day that I don’t fancy pasta, and I guarantee you it hasn’t made me look as drop dead gorgeous as La Loren. But I have always adored pasta in ALL its forms. Whether it’s lurking in a rich minestrone soup – ‘slurpable’ and comforting – or thick ribbons of egg pappardelle coated in a creamy Alfredo sauce; impossible to twirl yet so unbelievably delicious! Or little macaroni tubes coated unctuously in our four cheese Mac sauce that at Gastrono-me we’ve been making for eight years. Or even the humble Napoli sauce on a tired evening that picks you up in all the right ways. All of them make me salivate and gets me planning my next meal. At the beginning of the lockdown you can imagine my devastation upon seeing the desolate pasta shelves in the supermarket – more shocking than a scene from The Godfather! But, do you know what I miss the most? The independent archetypal trattoria. Growing up in Cardiff we were inundated with fantastic family-owned Italian restaurants, thanks to so many Italians emigrating to Wales in the early 1900s. The valleys were flooded with ice cream makers and coffee shops that must have seemed so impossibly glamorous to the native Welsh. I’m not sure if that feeling was reciprocated to these brave settlers who had swapped the Calabrian countryside for our brooding, coal-filled valleys. But something must’ve clicked because at one point we had as many as five Italian cafés on one street. On the high street you were spoiled for choice between pizzerias and trattorias. One of our favourites was called Waldo’s, a fabulously tiny but buzzing-at-the seams restaurant on Church Street. Over on the Hayes there was Giovanni’s, which had walls covered in photos of celebrities with a grinning Giovanni proudly posing by their side. Benedicto’s down Windsor Place was a little more exclusive and did the most perfect sauté potatoes and creamed spinach. Or there was our special haven, Luciano’s overlooking the Bristol Channel in perfect Penarth. All of these establishments Italian owned, Chianti tinged and bursting with Neapolitan pride. My beautiful mother and I would spend the happiest of lunches twirling spaghetti, sharing red wine and tearing at pungent garlic bread after shopping. Oh, to be able to time travel back to that precious era. My beautiful mum is no longer with me, neither are many of these beautiful restaurants. I do believe Giovanni’s is still fighting fit, which is wonderful in this current climate. But many got swallowed up by chains, cynically created to replicate their magic, but they absolutely failed to do so. These restaurants weren’t designed, they were patched together – red gingham tablecloths, Dean Martin crooning and homegrown with love. The proprietor had his name on the outside and his heart in the kitchen, and you knew that the young lad nervously lighting your Chianti bottle candle was his nephew or son, because that’s how family businesses worked, everyone mucked in to make the dream work. Food was fresh and passed down from nonnas, and my god it tasted good. Am I tinged with nostalgia? Maybe. But there was a generosity, a feeling that you’d been invited in by family and you left feeling happy and full. That feeling was something I knew I needed people to feel 20 years later when we created Gastrono-me. Yes, people come out to eat because they’re hungry, but they also come out to eat because of the experience, the generosity and the atmosphere. To be wished ‘buon appetito’ through a snowstorm of Parmigiano, to have your day enquired about, and to have your favourite dish remembered. So important.

So naturally I have chosen to share with you my Carbonara. A classic that everyone will know, but maybe not one that you attempt at home. Carbonara roughly translates to ‘in the manner of coal miners’, which is interesting when you think how my passion for Welsh/Italian restaurants began. It may also have earned its name from the flecks of black pepper that appear like coal dust against the creamy coating. As with all the best food, it is created simply and with great quality ingredients: Good quality spaghetti, free range egg yolks, Parmigiano Reggiano, guanciale or pancetta, olive oil, garlic and cracked black pepper. I love that on any given night most of these ingredients could reside in your kitchen, are fairly inexpensive, and within 15 minutes you have the most delicious dish. We go one step further at Gastrono-me and added a poached egg in our dish. I love the way it nestles in the spaghetti, and burst its beautiful yolk, coating the pasta even further.

Would love to hear your favourite Italian restaurant memories, or what your go to pasta dishes are.

Let us raise our glass of chianti to the most precious of carbs, Ms Loren we salute you!

Carbonara

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Easy
Servings

2

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Serve Time

5

minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 large free-range egg yolks

  • 45g of grated parmesan cheese

  • 150g of diced pancetta or if you can find it guanciale

  • 200g of spaghetti (look for rough edged pasta, it holds sauce so much better and usually denotes a far superior make of pasta)

  • 1 clove of crushed garlic

  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil

  • Cracked black pepper

  • Salt

Directions

  • In a large jug mix the egg yolks with the grated parmesan, season with salt and pepper – I like to add a tiny dash of olive oil, too. Mix it vigorously until it emulsifies.
  • Cook the spaghetti in a large pan of salted boiling water, cook it al dente for approximately 8 minutes.
  • Fry the pancetta in a little olive oil (you don’t need much as it will render its own lovely oils). When it’s nearly golden add the garlic, being careful not to let the garlic catch.
  • Before draining the pasta, carefully scoop out a good cupful of the boiling pasta water.
  • Drain the pasta and toss it into the lovely garlicky pancetta.
  • Now this is the tricky bit. . . You need to add the egg mix to the spaghetti, make sure the pasta is hot, but not so hot that the egg mixture scrambles. You need to work quickly and add enough of the pasta water to stop it being claggy. Do all of this off the heat. You will know you have got it right when the pasta is glossy/slippy (I know that sounds bats, but if you know, you know!).
  • Serve with a ‘snowstorm’ of grated parmesan, and a little more black pepper.
Mushrooms on Toast 768 1024 gastronome

Mushrooms on Toast

One of the oldest dishes at Gastrono-me is our Mushrooms on toast. It’s delicious, familiar and I chose it to share it with you because it can be recreated from home so easily.

I absolutely adore mushrooms, and as a vegetarian before Quorn and or other meat substitutes came about, mushrooms were the only way you could ensure a bit of substance and dare I say meatiness in your dish. We still use this principal now as a base for our Hallouminati Burger at Gastrono-me – a large field garlic baked mushroom, drenched in homemade pesto sauce and topped with smoky tomatoes, and of course the ever-popular griddled halloumi. This is just as popular a choice as the Vegilante burger where we use a plant-based patty – both are completely delicious, but with my love for all things fungi I plump for the juicy mushroom one every time.

They truly are a super food – fast and easy to cook, low in calories and fat-free, naturally low in sodium and laden with vitamins and antioxidants. If you think about it as well, they’re completely versatile, as they adapt themselves to practically every cuisine on the planet. So, if you have mushrooms in your fridge, you’re three quarters of the way there on a satisfying supper.

Garlic is of course the mushroom’s natural ally; they just naturally go hand in hand. Something about the mushrooms natural ‘boskiness’ and the pungent aroma of garlic is just kismet. Mike, my husband (Mr.Gastrono-me) and I used to frequent a seafront family run Italian restaurant in Cardiff many years ago and Mike, without fail would always order the mushrooms in garlic butter. They came sizzling to the table, parsley covered and with bread to dip into the delicious juices – simplicity itself but can still make Mike go misty eyed in hungry nostalgia.

I suppose it was with this memory, that when creating our very first menu for Gastrono-me I knew I wanted a mushroom dish to be included. In those days it was still fairly rare to go out for breakfast, which is why I was so determined to hook into that mealtime – for me it was fairly untapped, and we were fairly unknown, so I thought it was a good marriage. I sought inspiration from many places but kept coming back (and still do) to Australia’s café culture – something about the light, their breeziness, the climate, and the personality of the country just says breakfast to me. They’re utterly casual as a nation, and that laid-back honesty is at the heart of a relaxed breakfast and brunch.

The great Australian chef, writer, and restaurateur Bill Granger of Granger & Co fame had a mushrooms on toast recipe in one of his cookbooks I owned. It was the nucleus of the idea – his was with ricotta, and lemon, perfect for a sun-drenched morning in Melbourne, but I wanted a ‘mushroomy’ dish that would reflect a drizzly day in Bury St Edmunds as well. So, I set about creating a Gastrono-me mushrooms on toast. I knew I wanted spinach included – my family are now used to my quirk of putting spinach in everything, (the name Popeye has been cruelly bandied about more than once!) I am also a cheese fiend, so wanted a meltiness to come through the mushrooms – I tried a few different options – mozzarella gave a great melt but a bit too bland, gruyere a little too sweet, brie was a little too cloying. But Taleggio, a cow’s milk washed rind cheese was perfect. It’s quite mellow but still flavoursome, it has a hint of nuttiness, and melts like a dream, which was just what I wanted to create. The mushroom blend we use is chestnut and shiitake, and we sauté them in butter, or if for a vegan meal in olive oil (obviously minus the taleggio too). Seasoning is key, and then we finish them off with a drizzle of garlic oil, and that is literally all they require, such is the natural beauty of the dish.

I hope you enjoy making them, as much as we do. As always, I encourage you to play around with what you fancy. There are some super mushroom varieties in the supermarkets which are worth experimenting with, the spinach could be swapped out for smashed avocado, or sautéed kale, and I’ve recently been experimenting with different vegan cheeses – Violife’s Creamy with garlic & herbs slathered onto the toast before piling on the mushrooms works a treat.

Hope you enjoy making this at home, love to hear what swaps you made, and if you’re loved ones enjoyed it.

Mushrooms on Toast

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Easy
Servings

2

servings
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

10

minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 large slices of rustic bread

  • 30g of butter/if vegan 1 tbsp of olive oil

  • 350g mixed mushrooms sliced

  • 60g of Taleggio cheese

  • 200g baby spinach

  • Garlic oil

  • Salt and pepper

Directions

  • Heat a frying pan with butter/oil whichever is your preference, and warm. Then add the mushrooms. Cook for 3-5 minutes until they are just cooked – you want them still to have bite and not release too many of their juices or go slimy. Season well with salt and pepper.
  • Meanwhile toast your bread and butter it, if vegan drizzle with some of the garlic oil. Slice in half and arrange on the plate.
  • Once your mushrooms are cooked, move them to a separate plate and quickly sauté the spinach for a few seconds on a high heat in the leftover mushroom juices, don’t let the spinach wilt completely as we will be whizzing in the microwave briefly. Remove the spinach from the pan and arrange on top of the toast.
  • Tear the Taleggio into bite size pieces and nestle them in the spinach, this will make the end result more affective when melting.
  • Now top the spinach and toast with the cooked mushrooms, and heat in the microwave on high for one minute or until warmed through.
  • To finish drizzle with garlic oil, and another grind of black pepper.
Masala Scramble 792 1024 Gemma Simmonite

Masala Scramble

The rules and landscape of the restaurant scene in recent weeks have literally moved faster than a tyre change in an F1 pit lane.

First, we were closed down abruptly on March 23rd a day that never in our wildest dreams we could’ve predicted. And along with most restaurateurs we negatively started to predict that it could probably be at least October before we could open our doors and our ovens again – which seemed unfathomable on so many levels. But then on June 23rd it was announced that on July 4th we were all allowed to open our businesses again for indoor dining! It was the most glorious and terrifying news to digest all in one go.
From that moment we had just ten short days to prepare. We had to Covid-19 proof the entire place, follow every bit of legislation diligently with a fine a fine tooth comb, awaken our staff from their furlough slumbers and then we had to actually remember how to get back into the business of running a business again!

We announced to the world on that exciting day of our plans, and the bookings thankfully flooded in! We were brought to tears by some many of the phone booking messages and notes on the booking diary system – many “whoohoo’s” “can’t waits” and “welcome backs” one message from a dedicated customer even warned us to prepare the kitchen as he was going to probably order most things twice! Such gorgeous confirmation that we had been missed, and that we wouldn’t be twiddling our thumbs anxiously on re-opening day, something that we had of course envisaged in our darker moments.
Our team responded in the most incredible way when their call to arms was announced. They had clearly missed each other and their work home. They told us in fact that they were chomping at the bit to “just get back to normal”. And yet as owners we knew that it was probably going to be anything but normal.

Through this devastating pandemic, we’ve witnessed relatives admitted and discharged from hospital, and friend’s relatives sadly not be as lucky. It has wiped through the world with its calculated and evil precision. The thought of taking the re-opening Gastronono-me lightly was never an option, and we felt the weight of customers and staff’s safety firmly on our shoulders.
We had to immediately achieve that level of making everyone feel safe and protected. But at the same time, we were very aware that we didn’t want to scare anyone – after all isn’t dining out when you’re meant to forget your troubles? A place to retreat to and be treated? And by god we knew everyone needed treating! Four months of being cooks, teachers and carers is no easy task. So, in our July 4th opening we knew we wanted safety to be paramount, but it had to travel alongside our usual carefree vibe.

We have a saying Mike and I, and we’ve always said it when we’ve especially needed a full and vibrant restaurant – you know for a special day when we want to impress a client, or some precious friends or family have come to see the Gastrono-me for the first time, or even just to reach that end of month touchstone target – the saying is “Bury didn’t disappoint today” and on July 4th it was just the case! Boy it was busy, but because of preparation it wasn’t overwhelming, terrifying yes, but managed and firmly controlled. I watched from the side-lines. I watched Mike, Rick our amazing general manager and all of the fabulous front of house team take a deep breath in as they surveyed nervous customer faces appearing in the quirky queuing system we’d created. But with their calm and practised handling it really wasn’t long before those nervous faces were replaced with smiles and laughter.

And luckily so far, it has been like that ever since, tables have been full, albeit with quite a few removed, and customers have just been pleased to be able to spend time with us again.

Whilst quietly wandering around the entirety of Gastrono-me, I have been reminded of the part in Sleeping Beauty when the evil fairy’s spell is lifted, and the sleeping kingdom reawakens and comes to life again. Peeping in on the kitchen, I can see the chefs have smiles of contentment again as their talented hands have a direction once more. Front of house has a hum of chatter and gentle teasing easily floats through their conversations. It is all blissful to see and I’m very, very thankful.

We haven’t forgotten about the people who can’t or don’t feel like it’s time to leave home yet, and as a small measure towards that we’ve reintroduced our takeaway menu and hope that it’s some way of reminding them of happier times. I know we are long way from this damned disease being obliterated, but I feel there’s a beginning of hope and recovery for all.

I pondered as to which recipe I should use to express this feeling of new hope whilst wanting to retain a familiarity. My mind landed on my Masala Scramble. As the name suggests its of course scrambled eggs that even a novice could whip up, but it has the delicious surprise of chilli and a warming comfort of garam masala. It’s perfect for brunch if you’re not that sure of an early morning kick of spice, but I do promise it will kickstart your day!

The dish is based on the traditional Indian Eggs Akuri, or Eggs Parsi, but of course I have tinkered with it and found its Gastrono-me style. I hope you enjoy it, and that it adds a little mysterious decadence to your brunch repertoire.

Masala Scramble

Recipe by Gemma SimmoniteCourse: MainDifficulty: Easy
Servings

2

servings
Prep time

20

minutes
Cooking time

20

minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs

  • 1 tsp of double cream

  • ¼ tsp of garam masala

  • A small pinch of turmeric

  • A small pinch of chilli flakes

  • Chunky Chaat (an amazing ingredient I discovered – It’s a tantalising ground blend of spicy, sweet and sour, and hits just the right spot in this dish)

  • Butter for frying

  • 2 x naan, roti, paratha or bread of your choice

  • For the Kachumber
  • 1 tomato deseeded and diced

  • 1/2 green chilli deseeded and diced

  • A small end of a cucumber, deseeded and diced

  • Fresh coriander

  • Fresh mint

  • ½ small red onion finely diced

  • A dash of lemon juice

  • To finish and serve
  • I enjoy a blend of Raita, and Mango Chutney, but any favourite Indian chutney would work fabulously.

Directions

  • Start with the Kachumber first, Kachumber is a simple tomato salad, similar to a Mexican Pico de Gallo, I love that its name literally translates to ‘beat someone up nicely’! I promise it’s not as aggressive as that, and its freshness and tang really lifts the richness of the eggs.
  • Simply combine the chopped ingredients, tear the coriander and mint and toss the leaves into the salad with a little olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Start warming your Indian breads of choice, as the eggs are going to cook very quickly.
  • Now beat the eggs with the cream in a jug adding a pinch of salt
  • Melt the butter in a frying pan, and when the butter starts to bubble pour in your eggs.
  • Move the eggs gently around the pan with a wooden spoon, and add the turmeric, garam masala, chunky chaat and chilli flakes.
  • When just under set, remove the pan from the heat and let the eggs cook in the residual heat.
  • Remove your naans or whichever bread you’ve chosen from the grill, and smear both with a little mango chutney, or your chutney of choice.
  • Pour your scrambled eggs onto the warmed breads, and then take a handful of the Kachumber to sprinkle on top of each delicious egg mound. Drizzle with a little of the cooling raita and garnish with a little more fresh coriander.